Carl Wuttke

Carl Wuttke (1849 Trebnitz – 1927 München)

“Evening at the Deshengmen Gate (德胜门), Peking”

Material: Oil on wood
Dimension: 40 x 55 cm
Frame: Yes
Date: 1898
Certificate: Yes
Shipping: Worldwide

Provenance:Private

Exhibitions: Exhibition in Munich 1910. “Master pieces of islamic art.” 

Literature: Die Ausstellung von Meisterwerken muhammedanischer Kunst in München 1910. Unter Mitwirkung v. M. van Berchem, M. Dreger, Kühnel, C. List u. S. Schröder. Neuausgabe des amtlichen Kataloges. 3 Bände.

Description

Carl Wuttke (1849 Trebnitz – 1927 München)

“Deshengmen Gate (德胜门 ) in Peking, China (北京,中国) with view on the tower (Deshengmen jianlou 德胜门箭楼)”

Material: Oil on wood
Dimension: 40 x 55 cm
Frame: Yes
Date: 1898
Backside: Prof. C. Wuttke, München „Abend beim Stadt -Thor Dschien-men“ (Deshengmen) Peking

About the Artist:

Carl Wuttke (3 January 1849, Trebnitz – 4 July 1927, Munich) was a German landscape and architectural painter.
From 1871 to 1873, he studied at the Berlin University of the Arts, then with Angelo Quaglio in Munich. In 1874, he travelled to Italy on foot and remained there until 1876. After returning to Germany, he studied with Eugen Dücker at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf until 1880. Later, he went back to Italy, visiting Sardinia and Sicily as well. Many of his best-known works were sketched in those locations. He also made brief trips to Andalusia (1880) and Norway (1894). After 1885, he was a resident of Munich.

Worldwide trips

Some of his trips were to places considered exotic at the time; including Algeria, Egypt and the Sudan. In 1893, he visited the United States and, from 1897 to 1899, made a trip around the world, which included stops in China and Japan (1898). His sketches and paintings from there were used to create paintings for Kaiser Wilhelm II, which were hung in the “Silbersaal” (Silver Hall) of the Berliner Stadtschloss. The work “Deshengemen Gate, Peking” was exhibited in Munich 1910. (The verso with a printed label) „Ausstellung München 1910. Meisterwerke Muhammedanischer Kunst Musikfeste“. After the second world war many paintings disappeared.

His landscapes often include small genre scenes. As he progressed, his colors tended to grow brighter and his composition took on a fleeting effect, so that his work is often categorized as “Pre-Impressionist”, but he never associated himself with any Secessionist movement.