School of Ivan K. Aivazovsky

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School of Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky (19th Century)

Moon view of the Sevastopol Bay

Material: Oil on wood
Dimension: 18 x 36 cm
Frame: Yes
Certificate: Yes
Shipping: Worldwide

All Paintings at Davidjan Art Gallery are original and unique works.

Description

School of Aivazovsky, Ivan Konstantinovich (19th Century)

Moon view of the Sevastopol Bay

Material: Oil on wood
Dimension: 18 x 36 cm
Frame: Yes

About the work:

During Ivan K. Aivazovsky career, the he produced around 6,000 paintings of, what one online art magazine describes, “very different value … there are masterpieces and there are very timid works”. However, according to one count as many as 20,000 paintings are attributed to him. The vast majority of Aivazovsky’s works depict the sea. He rarely drew dry-landscapes and created only a handful of portraits. According to Rosa Newmarch Aivazovsky “never painted his pictures from nature, always from memory, and far away from the seaboard.” Rogachevsky wrote that “His artistic memory was legendary. He was able to reproduce what he had seen only for a very short time, without even drawing preliminary sketches.”Bolton praised “his ability to convey the effect of moving water and of reflected sun and moonlight.”

School of Aivazovsky

Aivazovsky was the most influential seascape painter in nineteenth-century Russian art. According to the Russian Museum, “he was the first and for a long time the only representative of seascape painting” and “all other artists who painted seascapes were either his own students or influenced by him.” Arkhip Kuindzhi (1841/2–1910) is cited by Krugosvet encyclopedia as having been influenced by Aivazovsky. In 1855, at age 13–14, Kuindzhi visited Feodosia to study with Aivazovsky, however, he was engaged merely to mix paints and instead studied with Adolf Fessler, Aivazovsky’s student. A 1903 encyclopedic article stated: “Although Kuindzhi cannot be called a student of Aivazovsky, the latter had without doubt some influence on him in the first period of his activity; from whom he borrowed much in the manner of painting.”English art historian John E. Bowlt wrote that “the elemental sense of light and form associated with Aivazovsky’s sunsets, storms, and surging oceans permanently influenced the young Kuindzhi.” Aivazovsky also influenced Russian painters Lev Lagorio, Mikhail Latri, and Aleksey Ganzen (the latter two were his grandsons)